MACADAMIA NUT GREEN TEA MEGA BITES


Were you thinking of giving up sugar too? What happens when you give it up and the 3 o’clock crave still hits? Well, I was just asking myself that too…
Since, overconfidently, I thought that giving up sugar resolution would be relatively easy. The quick convenience of sweetened baked goods are so thoughtless and everywhere. Plus, I not the biggest sweet tooth anyhow, and my constitution for perseverance has always been pretty good – however I’ve never tested it for weeks on end.
I’m not sure if it’s the subtle sweetness or the little crunch of nuts, or even the fact that’s these are healthy. They are satisfying and go perfectly with an afternoon tea, or anytime.

Indulgent and decadent these don’t feel guilt-free, but they are.
The first trial batch was Matcha Macadamia with Maca — Mmm.
We all know how great green tea is. Filled with antioxidants, it can help detoxify and elevate your mood.
Maca is a rich source of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, amino acids. It’s said to help balance hormones, and promotes energy.
Collagen is great for your joints, your skin and healing your gut.

See. Healthy treats!

If this wasn’t reason enough, we found a version of these pre-made in the local coffee shop. $1.25 a piece and these are just too easy to have someone else make them. img_0282

MACADAMIA NUT GREEN TEA MEGA BITES

1 Cup Macadamia Nuts
12 Dates
2 Tablespoons Matcha Powder, Green Tea
Scant 1/8 tsp Himalayan Salt
1 teaspoon Maca Powder
1 teaspoon Collagen Powder
1 teaspoon Coconut Oil
1/4 Cup Unsweetened, Flaked Coconut – for rolling

In a food processor or a powerful blender (vitamix), add the nuts and pulse to loosely grind. Add the dates and blend until finely ground, then add the coconut oil to combine.
Add and blend the matcha, salt, maca and collagen powder.
Roll by hand into 1″ balls, then roll to top in the flaked coconut.
Chill for about 30 minutes and store in the fridge.

Makes 12-15

 

 

Like Peas & Carrots


These friendly, sweet vegetables just go together. Fresh with a splash of Asian inspired dressing, it’s crisp and sooths the summer heat

I’m guessing these would go great with these Scallion Pancakes and just about anything grilled. Give it a try.

ASIAN PEA & CARROT SALAD

1/2 Lb Snow Peas, thinly sliced lengthwise, julienne
1 Lb Baby Carrots, thinly sliced lengthwise, matchsticks
1 teaspoon Freshly Grated Ginger, peeled
4 Tablespoons Toasted Sesame Seed Oil
2 Tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
Pinch Sugar
Salt & Pepper to taste
2 Tablespoons Sesame seeds, black if you can find them

In a small bowl, whisk together the sesame oil, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper.
If using regular white sesame seeds, lightly toast them in a dry pan until they just become golden over a medium-high heat. If using the black sesame seeds, you may skip this step.
Wash and thinly slice the vegetables. Toss them together in your serving bowl with your fingers to mix.
Drizzle and toss the dressing over the peas and carrots.
Sprinkle over the sesame seeds to serve.

Soba 101


One of my most favourite places to explore is any neighbourhood China Town. Bustling with people, new aromas, and spilling produce, this exciting area of most major cities is a feast for the eyes.

Here in Toronto, tucked a few blocks over from the central China Town is a small but wonderful Japanese store. After refilling my wasabi prescription, I gaze along the long aisles of offerings. Included are various teas, Hello Kitty Pocky sticks, every shade of miso, enoki mushrooms and of course, noodles.

Wheat, rice, green tea, tofu, ramen, udon and soba noodle varieties ready for any dish the Far East has ever created.

How elated was I to discover that soba is the name for buckwheat in Japanese?
For those of you who weren’t sure, like me, buckwheat is neither a grass or related to the wheat family. It’s a flowering plant which produces the seeds for great things like pillows and yes, buckwheat flour.

Asian noodle soup has to be in my top list of most amazing meals. The simplicity of them makes them satisfying and perfect. The noodles and broth create a host bowl for just about any combination imaginable.


Continue reading Soba 101

Sushi Nights & Wasabi Fights


Back when I was younger and maybe a little more daring, dinners at home were sure tear jerkers.

My room mate and I at the time would frequently bring home or make our own sushi. In fact, it was our equivalent to most other twenty something’s macaroni and cheese.

About a bottle of sake later, the games would begin….
Starting with a fleck, then working up to a gob, we would up each other’s wasabi intake. For those unfamiliar with the powers of the great green Japanese horseradish, wasabi most closely resembles a spicy hot mustard sensation.

Serving our sushi with it’s typical Wasabi-joyu, soy sauce combination for dipping, we embraced the festivities, upping the ante with the additional blob atop the sushi itself. You see, when wasabi is a even a little over loaded, the sensation is nothing like the burning tongue of a pepper. Starting with a tingle, it continues, flurrying up your nasal passage, stopping only at the bottom of your eye, usually finishing with a tear and a jolt of adrenaline.

Watching someone suffer is not only entertaining, but addictive, which, I suppose is why we did it. As juvenile foodies, I’m sure there is much more mischief we could have been getting ourselves into. But oh, it hurt so good.


Continue reading Sushi Nights & Wasabi Fights